Qtum: Combining the Best of Ethereum and Bitcoin

the year 2020 in Bitcoin Cash so far: a detailed history

the year 2020 in Bitcoin Cash so far: a detailed history
What follows at the bottom is a four page long chronological overview of what happened in BCH in 2020 so far. To make it more digestable and fun to read I start with my narrating of the story.
My attempt was to remain as objective as possible and "let the facts speak for themselve" with everything sourced. I also link to many read.cash articles, the decision of which are the important ones to include is certainly not easy, I count on the rest of the community if I overlooked anything important.

summary & my narrating of the story:
The year started out relatively calm, with cashfusion in "the news" and an older ongoing controversy between Amaury and Roger Ver being worked out. Starting Jan 22nd all debate broke loose with the announcement of “Infrastructure Funding Plan for Bitcoin Cash” by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP. To illustrate this point 2 days later coinspice ran the title " Roger Ver Praises Vigorous Debate, [...]" and 6 days, less than a week, later Chris Pacia made a read.cash post titled "The 253rd "Thoughts on developer funding" Article" which might have been only a slight exaggeration or he might have been counting. Part of the reason of the tsunami was the lack of worked out details. By the time of Pacia's post a lot had changed: Both BU, Bitcoin Verde and a group of miners had made announcements not to go along with "the plan".
On feb 1st, the second version of the IFP was announced by Jiang Zhuoer in a post “BCH miner donation plan update”. Two weeks later on Feb 15th, the third iteration was announced by Bitcoin ABC which was to be activated by hashrate voting and on the same day Flipstarter was introduced, a sign of the search for alternative solutions. After a few more days and a few more people coming out more against the IFP (including Jonald Fyookball, Mark Lundeberg & Josh Ellithorpe), BCHN was announced on feb 20th with a formal release a week later. Also feb 27th, the DAA was brought back into the conversation by Jonathan Toomim with his " The BCH difficulty adjustment algorithm is broken. Here's how to fix it." video. By early march the IFP was effectively dead with its author Jiang Zhuoer vowing to vote against it. This became clear to everyone when ABC, a day later sudddenly shifted gears towards non-protocol, donation based funding: the IFP was dead. End march ABCs 2020 Business Plan was announced as a way to raise $3.3 million. Mid april to mid may was the high time for voluntary funding with four node implementations and General Protocols, a BCH DeFi Startup successfully raising funds.
By May 15th, the 6th HF network upgrade things had pretty much cooled down. The upgraded included nothing controversial and even saw an unexpected doubling in the unconfirmed transaction chain. June 15th a month later things started to heat up again with the BCHN announcement to remove the "poison pill" or "automatic replay protection". 8th Jul Jonathan Toomim posted "BCH protocol upgrade proposal: Use ASERT as the new DAA" which promised the solution to the long dragging DAA problem. Jul 23th however an unexpected twist occurred when Amaury Séchet posted "Announcing the Grasberg DAA" an incompatible, alternative solution. This, again, sparked a ton of debate and discussion. Grasberg lasted just two weeks from Jul 23th to Aug 6th when ABC announced its plans for the november 2020 upgrade but it had successfully united the opposition in the meanwhile. ABCs plan for november included dropping grasberg in favour of aserti3–2d and introducing IFPv4. Now we're here August 8th, the IFP which was declared dead after just over a month (Jan 22-Mar 5) is now back in full force. The rest of the history is still being written but if p2p electronic cash is to succeed in any big regard it's very thinkable that these events will get into history books.

Important resources: coinspice IFP timeline & Compiled list of BCH Miner Dev Fund posts, articles, discussions

History
Jan 13th : “Do CoinJoins Really Require Equal Transaction Amounts for Privacy? Part One: CashFusion” article by BitcoinMagazine [source]
Jan 13th : “Clearing the Way for Cooperation” Read.cash article by Amaury Séchet [source] on the controversy with Roger Ver about the amount of donations over the years
Jan 22nd : “Infrastructure Funding Plan for Bitcoin Cash” IFPv1 announced by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] IFPv1: 12.5% of BCH coinbase rewards which will last for 6 months through a Hong Kong-based corporation & to be activated on May 15th
Jan 22nd : ”Bitcoin Cash Developers React to Infrastructure Fund Announcement: Cautiously Optimistic” coinspice article including Amaury Séchet, Antony Zegers, Jonald Fyookball & Josh Ellithorpe [source]
Jan 23rd : Jiang Zhuoer reddit AMA [source] [coinspice article]
Jan 23rd : Vitalik weighs in with his take on twitter [source]
Jan 23rd :” On the infrastructure funding plan for Bitcoin Cash” article by Amaury Séchet [source] [coinspice article] in which he proposed to place control of the IFP key in his hands together with Jonald Fyookball and Antony Zegers. . A group of 7 to 12 miners, developers, and businessmen in total would get an advisory function.
Jan 24th : “Bitcoin.com's Clarifications on the Miner Development Fund“ which emphasizes, among other things, the temporary and reversible nature of the proposal [source] [coinspice article]
Jan 24th : “Little Known (But Important!) Facts About the Mining Plan” Read.cash article by Jonald Fyookball in which he defended the IFP and stressed its necessity and temporary nature.
Jan 25th : massive amounts of public debate as documented by coinspice [coinspice article] with Justin Bons, Tobias Ruck and Antony Zegers explaining their take on it.
Jan 26th : public debate continues: “Assessment and proposal re: the Bitcoin Cash infrastructure funding situation” Read.cash article by imaginary_username [source] which was noteworthy in part because the post earned over Earns $1,000+ in BCH [coinspice article] and “The Best Of Intentions: The Dev Tax Is Intended to Benefit Investors But Will Corrupt Us Instead” by Peter Rizun [source]
Jan 27th : “We are a group of miners opposing the BTC.TOP proposal, here's why” article on Read.cash [source] [reddit announcement]
Jan 27th : Bitcoin Unlimited's BUIP 143: Refuse the Coinbase Tax [source][reddit announcement]
Jan 28th : “Bitcoin Verde's Response to the Miner Sponsored Development Fund” read.cash article by Josh Green in which he explains “Bitcoin Verde will not be implementing any node validation that enforces new coinbase rules.” [source]
Jan 28th : “Update on Developer Funding” read.cash article from Bitcoin.com [source] in which they state “As it stands now, Bitcoin.com will not go through with supporting any plan unless there is more agreement in the ecosystem such that the risk of a chain split is negligible.” And that “any funding proposal must be temporary and reversible.” This announcement from bitcoin.com and their mining pool lead the anonymous opposition miners to stand down. [source]
Jan 28th : The 253rd "Thoughts on developer funding" Article – by Chris Pacia, to tackle the “serious misconceptions in the community about how software development works”. He ends on a note of support for the IFP because of lack of realistic alternatives. [source]
Feb 1st: “BCH miner donation plan update” IFPv2 announced by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] Which changes the donation mechanism so miners directly send part of their coinbase to the projects they wants to donate to. It would be activated with hashrate voting over a 3-month period with a 2/3 in favour requirement. The proposal also introduces a pilot period and a no donation option, Jiang Zhuoer also says he regards 12.% as too much.
Feb 7th: Group of BCH miners led by AsicSeer voice scepticism about the IFP during a reddit AMA [source]
Feb 15th: “On the Miner Infrastructure Funding Plan” article by Bitcoin ABC [source] In which they announce they will implement IFPv3 in their upcoming 0.21.0 release. This version has amount reduced to 5% of block reward and will go in effect with BIP 9 hashratevoting and a whitelist with different projects.
Feb 15th : “Introducing Flipstarter” [source]
Feb 16th :” Bitcoin.com’s stance on the recent block reward diversion proposals” video by Roger Ver on the Bitcoin.com Official Channel. [source] > Ver called Zhuoer’s IFP “clever” but ultimately “problematic.” [coinspice article]
Feb 16th :” BCH miner donation plan update again” read.cash article by Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.TOP [source] In which he briefly outlines the details of IFPv3
Feb 17th : “Latest Thoughts On Infrastructure Mining Plan” post by Jonald Fyookball [source]
Feb 17th : “Regarding the Bitcoin Cash Infrastructure Funding Plan, I am certain now that it should be scrapped immediately.” tweet by Mark Lundeberg [source]
Feb 19th : “Thoughts on the IFP - A Dev Perspective“ read.cash article by Josh Ellithorpe [source]
Feb 20th : “Bitcoin Cash Node” post announcing the new node implementation [source]
Feb 20th : First “Bitcoin Cash Developer Meeting” After IFP Proposal [source]
Feb 24th : “Flipstarter 500k, 6 independent campaigns” post announcing the goal to “fund the BCH ecosystem with 6 independent campaigns and an overall 500,000 USD target” [source]
Feb 27th : BCHN Formally Released [source]
Feb 27th : “The BCH difficulty adjustment algorithm is broken. Here's how to fix it.” Video by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Mar 3th :” Bitcoin Cash Node 2020: plans for May upgrade and beyond” post by BCHN [source]
Mar 4th :”Author of the Bitcoin Cash IFP [Jiang Zhuoer] Vows to Vote Against It, Using Personal Hash in Opposition” [source]
Mar 5th :Bitcoin ABC announces their 2020 Business Plan Fundraising for later in march [source]
Mar 15th : “EatBCH campaign funded! Next: node campaigns.” campaign funded after 11 hours [source]
Mar 30th : Bitcoin ABC 2020 Business Plan [source] $3.3 Million Fundraiser [source]
Apr 17th : Five flipstarter node campaign launched. [source]
Apr 26th : BCHN flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
Apr 27th : VERDE flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 4th : KNUTH flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 7th : “BCH DeFi Startup General Protocols Raises Over $1 mil“ [source]
May 8th : BCHD flipstarter campaign successfully funded. [source]
May 9th : Deadline for node campaigns, ABC flipstarter campaign not funded. [source]
May 14th : “With IFP Defeated, Bitcoin ABC, ViaBTC & CoinEX CEO Publicly Consider a Bitcoin Cash Foundation” [source]
May 15th : deadline for ABC fundraiser campaign, ends at 55% completed. [source]
May 15th : 6th HF network upgrade -> new opcode op_Reversebytes, increased of the chained transaction limit from 25 to 50, and the improved counting of signature operations using the new “Sigchecks” implementation [source] with the “Controversial Funding Plan Rejected by Miners” [source]
May 25th : “Announcing the SLP Foundation” [source]
Jun 15st : “BCHN lead maintainer report 2020-06-15” announcement to remove the Automatic Replay Protection (a.k.a. the Poison Pill) from BCHN in november [source]
Jun 16st : “So [BCHN] is going to fork off from BCH at the next upgrade. Same old story. […]” tweeted Vin Armani [source]
Jun 21st : “Why Automatic Replay Protection Exists” post by Shammah Chancellor [source]
Jul 7th : “The Popular Stablecoin Tether Is Now Circulating on the Bitcoin Cash Network” [source]
Jul 8th : “BCH protocol upgrade proposal: Use ASERT as the new DAA” post by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Jul 18th : “$6M Worth of Tether on the Bitcoin Cash Chain Highlights the Benefits of SLP Tokens” [source]
Jul 23th : “Announcing the Grasberg DAA” post by Amaury Séchet[source]
Jul 24th : “Thoughts on Grasberg DAA” post by Mark Lundeberg [source]
Jul 29th : CashFusion security audit has been completed [source]
Jul 31st : Electron Cash 4.1.0 release with CashFusion support [source]
4th year, august 2020 – 2021
Aug 1st : “Bitcoin Cash: Scaling the Globe“ Online conference for ForkDay Celebration [source]
Aug 2nd : >“Is there going to be a fork between ABC and BCHN?” > “IMO it is very likely. If not in November, then next May.” – Amaury Séchet
Aug 3rd : “Dark secrets of the Grasberg DAA” post by Jonathan Toomim [source]
Aug 3rd : “Joint Statement On aserti3-2d Algorithm“ post by General Protocols, including Cryptophyl, Read.cash, Software Verde & SpinBCH [source]
Aug 3rd : Knuth announces they will be implementing aserti3-2d as DAA for november. [source]
Aug 3rd : Amaury rage quit from the developer call [source]
Aug 4th : “But why do people care about compensating for historical drift? Seems like a tiny problem and if it's causing this much social discord it seems not even worth bothering to try to fix.” Tweet by Vitalik [source]
Aug 5th : “Bitcoin Cash (BCH) November 2020 Upgrade statement” signed by BCHD, electron cash, VERDE, BU members, BCHN developers, Jonathan Toomim, Mark B. Lundeberg and many others [source]
Aug 5th : “BCHN FAQ on November 2020 Bitcoin Cash network upgrade” [source]
Aug 6th : “Bitcoin ABC’s plan for the November 2020 upgrade” [source] the announcement that they will drop Grasberg in favour of aserti3–2d (ASERT) and will also include FPv4 in which 8% of the blockreward goes to ABC as development funding.
Aug 7th : “Joint Statement from BCH Miners regarding Bitcoin ABC and the November 2020 BCH Upgrade.” Read.cash article by asicseer [source] stating “Over recent months, most miners and pools have switched to BCHN, and presently operate a majority of BCH hashrate.”
Aug 7th : “Simple Ledger Protocol's Joint Statement Regarding Bitcoin ABC on BCH's November 2020 Upgrade” read.cash post by the SLP-Foundation [source]
submitted by Mr-Zwets to btc [link] [comments]

IOTA, and When to Expect the COO to be Removed

Hello All,
This post is meant to address the elephant in the room, and the #1 criticism that IOTA gets which is the existence of the Coordinator node.
The Coordinator or, COO for short, is a special piece of software that is operated by the IOTA Foundation. This software's function is to drop "milestone" transactions onto the Tangle that help in ordering of Transactions.
As this wonderful post on reddit highlights (https://www.reddit.com/Iota/comments/7c3qu8/coordinator_explained/)
When you want to know if a transaction is verified, you find the newest Milestone and you see if it indirectly verifies your transaction (i.e it verifies your transaction, or if verifies a transaction that verifies your transaction, or if it verifies a transaction that verifies a transaction that verifies your transaction, etc). The reason that the Milestones exist is because if you just picked any random transaction, there's the possibility that the node you're connected to is malicious and is trying to trick you into verifying its transactions. The people who operate nodes can't fake the signatures on Milestones, so you know you can trust the Milestones to be legit.
The COO protects the network, that is great right?
No, it is not.
The coordinator represents a centralized entity that draws the ire of the concurrency community in general is the reason behind a lot of FUD.
Here is where things get dicey. If you ask the IOTA Foundation, the last official response I heard was
We are running super computer simulations with the University of St. Peteresburg to determine when that could be a possibility.
This answer didn't satisfy me, so I've spent the last few weeks thinking about the problem and think I can explain the challenges that the IOTA Foundation are up against, what they expect to model with the super computer simulations, and what ultimately what my intuition (backed up by some back of the napkin mathematics) tells me that outcomes will be.
In order to understand the bounds of the problem, we first need to understand what our measuring stick is.
Our measuring stick provides measurements with respect to hashed per second. A hash, is a mathematical operation that blockchain (and DAG) based applications require before accepting your transaction. This is generally thought of as an anti-spam measure used to protect a blockchain network.
IOTA and Bitcoin share some things in common, and one of those things is that they both require Proof of Work in order to interact with the blockchain.
In IOTA, a single hash is completed for each Transaction that you submit. You complete this PoW at the time of submitting your Transaction, and you never revisit it again.
In Bitcoin, hashes are guessed at by millions of computers (miners) competing to be the first person to find solve the correct hash, and ultimately mint a new block.
Because of the competitive nature of the bitcoin mining mechanism, the bitcoin hashrate is a sustained hashrate, while the IOTA hashrate is "bursty" going through peaks and valleys as new transactions are submitted.
Essentially, IOTA performance is a function of the current throughput of the network. While, bitcoin's performance is a delicate balance between all collective miners, the hashing difficulty with the goal of pegging the block time to 10 minutes.
With all that said, I hope it is clear that we can come to the following conclusion.
The amount of CPU time required to compute 1 Bitcoin hash is much much greater then the amount of CPU time required to compute 1 IOTA hash.
T(BtcHash) >> T(IotaHash)
After all, low powered IOT devices are supposed to be able to execute the IOTA hashing function in order to submit their own transactions.
A "hash" has be looked at as an amount of work that needs to be completed. If you are solving a bitcoin hash, it will take a lot more work to solve then an IOTA hash.
When we want to measure IOTA, we usually look at "Transactions Per Second". Since each Transaction requires a single Hash to be completed, we can translate this measurement into "Hashes Per Second" that the entire network supports.
IOTA has seen Transactions Per Second on the order of magnitude of <100. That means, that at current adoption levels the IOTA network is supported and secured by 100 IOTA hashes per second (on a very good day).
Bitcoin hashes are much more difficult to solve. The bitcoin network is secured by 1 Bitcoin hash every 10 minutes (which adjust's it's difficult over time to remain pegged at 10 minutes). (More details on bitcoin mining: https://www.coindesk.com/information/how-bitcoin-mining-works/)
Without the COOs protection, IOTA would be a juicy target destroy. With only 100 IOTA hashes per second securing the network, that means that an individual would only need to maintain a sustained 34 hashes per second in order to completely take over the network.
Personally, my relatively moderate gaming PC takes about 60 seconds to solve IOTA Proof of Work before my transaction will be submitted to the Tangle. This is not a beastly machine, nor does it utilize specialized hardware to solve my Proof of Work. This gaming PC cost about $1000 to build, and provides me .0166 hashes per second.
**Using this figure, we can derive that consumer electronics provide hashing efficiency of roughly $60,000 USD / Hash / Second ($60k per hash per second) on the IOTA network.
Given that the Tx/Second of IOTA is around 100 on a good day, and it requires $60,000 USD to acquire 1Hash/Second of computing power we would need 34 * $60,000 to attack the IOTA network.
The total amount of money required to 34% the IOTA project is $2,040,00
This is a very small number. Not only that, but the hash rate required to conduct such an attack already exists, and it is likely that this attack has already been attempted.
The simple truth is, that due to the economic incentive of mining the hash rate required to attack IOTA is already centralized, and are foaming at the mouth to attack IOTA. This is why the Coordinator exists, and why it will not be going anywhere anytime soon.
The most important thing that needs to occur to remove the COO, is that the native measurement of transactions per second (which ultimately also measures the hashes per second) need to go drastically up in orders of magnitude.
If the IOTA transaction volume were to increase to 1000 transactions per second, then it would require 340 transactions per second from a malicious actor to compromise the network. In order to complete 340 transactions per second, the attacker would need now need the economic power of 340 * $60,000 to 34% attack the IOTA network.
In this hypothetical scenario, the cost of attacking the IOTA network is $20,400,000. This number is still pretty small, but at least you can see the pattern. IOTA will likely need to hit many-thousand transactions per second before it can be considered secure.
What we have to keep in mind here, is that IOTA has an ace up their sleeve, and that Ace is JINN Labs and the ternary processor that they are working on.
Ultimately, JINN is the end-game for the IOTA project that will make the removal of the COO a reality.
In order to understand what JINN is, we need to understand a little bit about computer architecture and the nature of computational instruction in general.
A "processor" is a piece of hardware that performs micro calculations. These micro calculations are usually very simple, such as adding two numbers, subtracting two numbers, incrementing, decrementing, and the like. The operation that is completed (addition, subtraction) is called the opcode while the numbers being operated on are called the operands.
Traditional processors, like the ones you find in my "regular gaming PC" are binary processors where both the opcode and operands are expected to be binary numbers (or a collection of 0s and 1s).
The JINN processor, provides the same functionality, mainly a hardware implementation of micro instructions. However, it expects the opcodes and operands to be ternary numbers (or a collection of 0s, 1s, and 2s).
I won't get into the computational data density of base 2 vs. base 3 processors, nor will get I get into the energy efficiency of those processors. What I will be getting into however, is how certain tasks are simpler to solve in certain number systems.
Depending on what operations are being executed upon the operands, performing the calculation in a different base will actually reduce the amount of steps required, and thus the execution time of the calculation. For an example, see how base 12 has been argued to be superior to base 10 (https://io9.gizmodo.com/5977095/why-we-should-switch-to-a-base-12-counting-system)
I want to be clear here. I am not saying that any 1 number system is superior to any other number system for all types of operations. I am simply saying, that there exist certain types of calculations that are easier to perform in base 2, then they are performed in base 10. Likewise, there are calculations that are vastly simpler in base 3 then they are in base 2.
The IOTA POW, and the algorithms required to solve for it is one of these algorithms. The IOTA PoW was designed to be ternary in nature, and I suggest that this is the reason right here. The data density and electricity savings that JINN provides are great, but the real design decision that has led to base 3 has been that they can now manufacture hardware that is superior at solving their own PoW calculations.
Binary emulation, is when a binary processor is asked to perform ternary operations. A binary processor is completely able to solve ternary hashes, but in order to do so it will need to emulate the ternary micro instructions at a higher level in the application stack from away from the hardware.
If you had access to a base 3 processor, and needed perform a base 3 addition operation you could easily ask your processor to natively perform that calculation.
If all you have access to, is a base 2 processor, you would need to emulate a base 3 number system in software. This would ultimately result in a higher number of instructions passing through your processor, more electricity being utilized, more time to complete.
Finally, let's review these figures.
It costs roughly $60k to acquire 1hash per second in BASE 2 consumer electrictronic. It costs roughly $2M to acquire enough BASE 2 hash rate to 34% the IOTA network.
JINN, will be specifically manufactured hardware that will solve base 3 hashes natively. What this likely means, is that $1 spent on JINN will be much more effective at acquiring base 3 hash rate then $1 spent on base 2 hash rate.
Finally, with bitcoin and traditional block chain applications there lies economic incentive to amass mining hardware.
It first starts out by a miner earning income from his mining rig. He then reinvests those profits on additional hardware to increase his income.
Eventually, this spirals into an arms raise where the players that are left in the game have increasingly available resources up until the point that there are only a handful of players left.
This economic incentive, creates a mass centralization of computing resources capable of being misused in a coordinated effort to attack a cryptocurrency.
IOTA aims to break this economic incentive, and the centralization that is causes. However, over the short term the fact that the centralization of such resources does exist is an existential peril to IOTA, and the COO is an inconvenient truth that we all have to live with.
Due to all the above, I think we can come to the following conclusions:
  1. IOTA will not be able to remove the COO until the transactions per second (and ultimately hashrate) increase by orders of magnitude.
  2. The performance of JINN processors, and their advantage of being able to compute natively on ternary operands and opcodes will be important for the value ratio of $USD / hash rate on the IOTA network
  3. Existing mining hardware is at a fundamental disadvantage to computing base 3 hashes when compared to a JINN processor designed specifically for that function
  4. Attrition of centralized base 2 hash power will occur if the practice of mining can be defeated and the income related to it. Then the incentive of amassing a huge amount of centralized computing power will be reduced.
  5. JINN processors, and their adoption in consume electronics (like cell phones and cars) hold the key in being able to provide enough "bursty" hash rate to defend the network from 34% attacks without the help of the COO.
  6. What are the super computer simulations? I think they are simulating a few things. They are modeling tip selection algorithms to reduce the amount of unverified transactions, however I think they may also be performing some simulations regarding the above calculations. JINN processors have not been released yet, so the performance benchmarks, manufacturing costs, retail costs, and adoption rates are all variables that I cannot account for. The IF probably has much better insight into all of those figures, which will allow them to better understand when the techno-economic environment would be conducive to the disabling of the COO.
  7. The COO will likely be decentralized before it is removed. With all this taken into account, the date that the COO will be removed is years off if I was forced to guess. This means, that decentralizing the COO itself would be a sufficient stop-gap to the centralized COO that we see today.
submitted by localhost87 to Iota [link] [comments]

Glad to see my intuition being right (on Ethereum)

Soon after Ethereum was announced, on January 24, 2014 I've made a comment:
But there might be a problem with resource usage... Let's say I own a lot of bitcoins and I do not want Ethereum to exist.
So I'll run multiple high-performance, clustered nodes and use them to process transactions which will consume as much resources as possible. Soon running Ethereum nodes requires 1 TB of RAM.
People say: "What the fuck? Clearly making scripts Turing-complete was a bad idea". And Ethereum is abandoned as a broken project... (Few people can afford to run full nodes, so it is as good as centralized.)
This attack might costs many millions USD, but if that helps to protect my Bitcoin investment, it makes sense.
Note that this was written before any details on Ethereum were settled, just general thoughts based on Ethereum's idea of running "Turing-complete scripts".
So it looks like this kind of a scenario is unfolding now, 2.5 years after I've written then comment:
  1. September 18, 2016: All geth nodes crash due to an out of memory bug. A specially crafted block makes geth, the most popular Ethereum node software, to request huge amounts of RAM, and thus crash. According to some reports, 85% of all Ethereum nodes are running Geth at the time. All of them were crashing, services (and wallets) which relied on them couldn't function.
  2. September 22: "Today the network was attacked by a transaction spam attack that repeatedly called the EXTCODESIZE opcode (see trace sample here), thereby creating blocks that take up to ~20-60 seconds to validate due to the ~50,000 disk fetches needed to process the transaction. The result of this was a ~2-3x reduction in the rate of block creation while the attack was taking place; there was NO consensus failure". Ethereum blocks should normally appear each ~15 seconds, but they take ~20-60 seconds to validate. Thus a normal node just couldn't keep up with blocks. Thankfully, miners got slowed down too, so there was "NO consensus failure" this time.
  3. September 25: "attacker has changed strategy ... Basically, it's now a quadratic memory complexity attack but using CALL instead of EXTCODESIZE. However because the gas limit is only 1.5m, the effect is lower, so geth nodes are just running more slowly and not crashing outright. "
jtoomim shared some details on what it's like to run an Ethereum node:
On my nodes, I'm seeing up to 16 GiB of virtual memory being used. This crashed one of my nodes twice, since it only had 8 GiB of RAM and 2 GiB of swap. I added more swap space, and that seems to have helped the crashing. I also changed the db cache size according to the blog post recommendations, and I'm now making it through the attack blocks in about 5 seconds on that machine. My other server has 16 GiB of RAM and a 4.4 GHz quad-core CPU, and it makes it through the attack blocks in about 2-3 seconds. Both have SSDs and are running Parity 1.3.
With geth, some of these blocks take up to 2 minutes to verify.
So it seems like fairly decent server-class hardware is necessary to keep up with the Ethereum blockchain now. If you run the heavily optimized Ethereum implementation, Parity.
Ethereum devs try to mitigate the issue by recommending miners to increase transaction fees (gas price) and reduce block size (gas limit). This could hurt apps/users, if there were any.
Now, this attack isn't going to kill Ethereum, of course. It's more like a warning. The cost of the attack is estimated to be on the scale of $5000 per day, so it's not some kind of largescale attempt to kill Ethereum.
I think things could be much worse if an attacker also had an access to significant amounts of mining hashpower: this would have allowed him to mine huge blocks at zero cost.
Also Ethereum node hardware requirements might grow due to demands of legitimate applications.
submitted by killerstorm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Serious question about starting a business on bitcoinsv

So I worked all of 2018 on a company I was going to launch on BCH.

One of the things that I liked about BCH is this company would deal with really large transactions, average deposit to my site would be about $15,000 USD and the fees on BCH would make this unbeatable compared to all other methods. I did some testing factoring in slippage and even then, completely worthwhile compared to the costs associated with this using fiat and the traditional banking system. I've abstracted away most of the technical stuff so other than funding via coinbase/gemini, they won't even know they're using crypto. Even binded coinbase/gemini with the site so it's a seamless transition. Set up nodes , the golang backend servers, frontend with d3/reactjs and even tested on the BCH testnet. It worked flawlessly and would compete with the best out of Silicon Valley.

Then the fork happened. Now I don't know which chain to go with. The main reasons I'm considering BSV is the higher opcode limit which would benefit what I'm doing. I'm also not a fan of the ABC roadmap and I'm also worried about the direction they're taking BAB. CSW makes excellent points about bitcoin needing to be business friendly and I don't need the headaches of governments messing with business my because I chose the chain illegal stuff is happening on.

However, this appears to be a super lucrative niche market I'm targeting, overlooked by cryptocurrency for no good reason. I'm self funding this myself. I DO NOT want to raise funding. I'm worried that a larger business would try to invest and then since they can't, simply create their own version. BSV right now worries me because Coingeek and NChain have way more money than I do. They control the mining and the dev team. What assurances do I have that if they are unable to invest in my business, that they won't block my transactions or interfere with my business somehow? What if they block me and build their own version of what I'm doing to cut me out? It appears that both chains can potentially ruin my business. My backup at this point is to rewrite most of what I've done for ethereum even though I dislike it. I'm leaving money on the table every day that I'm not in business.

If anyone from Coingeek/Nchain would like to discuss this, contact me via pm.






submitted by BITCOIN718 to bitcoinsv [link] [comments]

DEVCON2 report: Day Three - Final day

previous days
Question: the 3 days of devcon are over. Are people interested in reports on the next 3 days of international Blockchain week (demo day + 2 days of global Blockchain summit) http://www.blockchainweek2016.org
`
Event update
The buzz during the day was around the "stick puzzle" that Bok Khoo was giving out to people. It is just a stick, with a loop of string. He gets you to turn away, he uses "the trick" to put it onto your bag and then you try to get it off.
The WeChat channel was just filled with everyone asking where they can get it, and the screaming that they can't figure it out. Only about 5 people reported they were able to solve it (I haven't yet)
http://imgur.com/mYfJQP4 http://imgur.com/4Euka1a
`
Sessions
I'm biased, but I thought the announcement from Microsoft with the update of cryptlets was a big deal. The morning sessions covered a few different oracle systems, the afternoon had lots of IPFS sessions.
Microsoft - A Lap around Cryptlets
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/cryptletsdd/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/templates/ethereum-consortium-blockchain-network/ https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/authomarleyg
Microsoft was a sponsor of Devcon1 & 2 Ethereum is a 1st class citizen Support for community & partners - Bizspark, Meetups, Workshops
Announcing: Bletchley v1 Distributed Ledger stack V1 is a private Ethrerum consortium, that you can spin up for your own enterprise / group
http://imgur.com/olwwd36
Cryptlets are being developed to help with security, identity, etc. How do you get trusted external data feeds injected into the Blockchain? Doing things on a specific interval (every 15 mins) When price of something hits a threshold (oil goes above $40/barrel) Secure IP protected algorithms, but still share with blockchain network. Use libraries for common platforms (.Net, Java, etc)
Cryptlets vs Oracle Cryptlets will have a marketplace on Azure that will allow you to purchase and utilise
Use case: Trigger on an event Wake up on 4pm, if market was open that day, then give me the price of gold for that day.Get signature of attested server, attested sender.
Use case: Control Using smart contract like a traditional DB. Declare data you are keeping track of, and the functions/"stored proc" to update that data. Cryptlet runs off chain, and can be scaled up.
http://imgur.com/ysgL8S2
Utility cryptlet. Use an attribute in solidity contract with cryptlet details Developer references at design time the cryptlet they want the contract to call Contract cryptlet, deploy the cryptlet at same time as contract.
Why would you want Azure to do this? SGX allows you to create "secure enclaves", can have complete isolation on the hardware chip where it is not modifable. Provides a secure enclave at the CPU level. Can give full attestation right down to the silicon. Will be provided as a enclave container on Azure. Will be released for .NET core CLR first, then other languages. Can create cryptlet libraries that you can scale and put into the Azure marketplace. An ecosystem for developers & ISVs to consume and publish.
Bletchley v1 released today will let you spin up a private consortium. Before today, it took a long time to try and deploy a private consortium (can take weeks to read doco, Now takes 5 minutes to deploy! Creates a private consortium, puts each member in its own separate subnet
http://imgur.com/w4yUsqE
Mist Vision and Demo I was too busy sharing the release posts of Microsoft project bletchey v1, missed this talk. It did look interesting, I will watch this one later. Idea: Reward for bandwidth. Providing connection could replace mining as entrance point for desktop computers. Allow you to have a trickle so you can trigger smart contracts. Standardised backends, so that you can swap out the underlying node between geth, blockapps, etc.
Web3.js
https://github.com/ethereum/web3.js Etehereum JS API Smart conracts are EVM opcodes, Helps translates calls to JSON RPC calls. Helps do the ABI encoding when sending data from JS to EVM It kept on growing, many different utility functions being thrown in. Is time to clean it up and be refactored.
They are now building a NEW web3.js The communication will be socket based, will enable subscriptions. Everything will be based on promises to subscribe to events, like log events. Bunch of other newer cleaner methods and ways to do things like deploying contracts.
Smart contract security
Was a very good postmorteum of The DAO and things that could be done to mitigate it in the future.
An issue with The DAO was trying to do a massive jump from centralisation all the way to full decentralisation. Meant no one could step up and make a decision on how to save it. We need to make smaller steps towards full decentralisation as we learn as a community how to do this. Same security patterns as yesterday's talks: check invarients, beware 1024 call stack depth, reentry exploit (update state BEFORE executing calls), timestamps are manipulatable. Updateable contracts. Who can update it? Community multisig? We need better rools: formal verification, compiler warnings, improved IDEs, trusted libraries, excape hatches
Conclusion: It is still very early days in this space, be careful.
A Provably Honest Oracle Model: Auditable Offchain Data Gathering & Computations
Oracalize is the most widely used oracle (until everyone starts using Microsoft Azure cryptlets ;-) ) Contract calls Oracalize contract with the data they want, off chain they see this get the data, Oracalise then trigger their contract externally, which does a callback to your contract with the data. Can use external notary servers. Can get proof from multiple external services to get a higher level of confidence about data (e.g. stock price from a few feeds). Off-chain (auditable_ computation) AWS sandbox 2.0. Put the execution package onto IPFS, AWS gets it and executes it, signs it.
iEx.ec: Fully Distributed Cloud Thanks to the Ethereum Blockchain
http://iex.ec/ Provides blockchain based execution environments Global market for computing resources. Idea is to do what we did before with "grid computing" use the idle capacity of computers. But this time do a trickle of micropayments. Allows people to harness this global power to execute their tasks in a global "distributed cloud".
The Final frontier: The company smart conract
http://otonomos.com/ Helping companies to incorporate on the blockchain.
Smart oracles
https://github.com/smartoracles Connecting to external resources is difficult. Hard to try and use external currencies (like a bank account / fiat money) to make transactions. Could hook in paypal, HSBC, wells fargo, etc. Can provide your own payment services as an API to a smart oracle for smart contracts to consume. Do off chain data storage by calling smart oracle API Roadmap: more data sources & more payment methods
IPFS & Ethereum: Updates
https://Ipfs.io IPFS is AMAZING, seriously go watch the full 1 hour talks Juan has given in previous years.
Current web has current issues. Centralisation, etc. IPFS is a new hypermedia transfer protocol Content can be retrieved not from specific servers, but instead via it's hash so that it can come from anywhere in the network (maybe from the person next to you who has cached it). It is highly modular, all of the transfer protocals, routing, naming, etc. are all swapable Is available as GO-IPFS & now JS-IPFS Means now you can run IPFS in the browser IPFS was great for static content, but not so great for dynamic content. Low latency pub/sub protocol will help with dynamic data. Created a distributed peer to peer chat app using this new dynamic content protocol. IPLD a common link-tree hash format Will be able to use IPFS to retrieve ethereum blockchain blocks DIRECTLY Can use IPFS as a package manager to retrieve them in a distributed manner.
Many projects are using Ethereum & IPFS Uport, Digix, Infura, Ujo, Eris, Blockfreight. Filecoin was created as a way to try and incentivize nodes to keep files longer time. People rent out hdd space to earn filecoin. Exchange bitcoin/filecoin. Use filecoin to store files in network. Filecoin is going to be built on top of the public Ethereum blockchain, as a virtual blockchain / token.
IPFS Libp2p & Ethereum networking
Network connectivity between any 2 nodes can be difficult. Censorship, bandwidth, network issues, etc. Having to deal with different networking topologies and access. Libp2p & Devp2p is different. Devp2p is for Ethereum. LIbp2p is modular, can swap out components to change network access, encryption methods, etc. Can build up a MEGA mesh network, by utilising traditional wired internet, radio, bluetooth between some nodes. Web browser using web socket, to a node, which routes across network, to zigbee to a IoT device. Libp2p & Devp2p could merge and augment each other. Could create the libp2p components to replace the devp2p bits Any 2 nodes that speak the same protocol can communicate and be a part of the network chain. Experiment. They took the browser based version of EVM. Then used Libp2p to talk to the Ethereum network. Had a complete ethereum node running in a browser.
Uport
https://uport.me/ Universal identity platform Current challenges: key management. Ux for average person. Dapps via mobile. Identity and data ownership. How do you keep a consistent identity, even if you lose a key. Have some multisig contracts that you can use to keep track. Social recovery, use your friends to attest it is really you. Keep private key on mobile, do transactions on the desktop, scan a QR code to sign the transaction on your phone and send it off.
A Deep Dive into the Colony Foundation Protocol
It is an open source governance protocol built on Ethereum Problem with voting is how to prevent Sybil attacks. Votes are weighted by a reputation score. Reputation is non-transferable that can only be earned. Total weighted voting helps mitigate this.
Chain orchestration tooling & smart contract package management
Eris is tooling for developers. Package manager to build your own blockchain. Can compose a chain, e.g. geth + tendermint consensus. Init, install, do. Can easily install on Mac/bew, linux/apt-get, Windows/choco
The Golem Project: Ethereum-based market for computing power
http://www.golemproject.net/ Anyone can make an offer to sell computing power. e.g. Distributed rendering Want to create a standard framework that anyone can use to submit and process jobs.
Status: Integrating Ethereum Into Our Daily Lives
https://status.im Want to get ethereum everywhere. "Mist for Mobile" Everyone is using their mobile phones for everything, but mostly using instant messaging. What would Ethereum in a IM window look? Created a IM mobile app that has a local geth node. tart up, it asks you to create a password, it generates a pub/private pair. Then can send messages via whisper, and the messages are signed with your public key. Can load Dapps up in the local webview and interact with them. Allows you to create "chat Dapps", that you interact with via text. Like chatbots
Maker Ecosystem Overview
www.Makerdao.com Dai: seeking stability on blockchain. Stablecoin engine: smart contract that holds collateral reserves and controls the Dai lifecycle. MKR: open source community managing risk of the system In the last year, investing in a solid technical core. More slow and audit things. Moving into the next phase of stablecoin development. Their latest project is the "Simplecoin project" Meeting Thereum community's need for stability. An independent platform for creating centrally administered simple stablecoins. Issues create their own rule sets: Collateral types, participant whitelists, security parameters. Example: Shrutebucks. The only people who own it are Dwight, Jim & Pam. They backed it with 1/3 ETH 1/3 DGX 1/3 DUSD.
Orbit. A distributed peer to peer app on IPFS
https://github.com/haadcode Created a full distributed chat room, itself distributed through IPFS. It is integrated with uPort for identification Using uPort allows you to verify that you are talking to the correct person in the chat channel. All their messages are signed with their public keys He also created a full distribited twitter clone, using uport for the identity as well. Orbit-db key value store DB that stores its data on IPFS. Eventually consistent Appends data to the DB, an event is sent to those subscribed on pub/sub so they can see the latest root hash. Based on CRDT Ethereum + Pubsub + CRDTs + IPFS = super power primatives to build dynamic distributed apps
Development considerations with distributed apps. Need to ensure that apps work offline. No centralised servers. No data silos. Provide integration path.
Future work: could you use uPort for ACL like permissions? Mobile use cases, how to make it work nicely on mobiles
Building scalable React Dapp architecture
https://github.com/SilentCicero/react-dapp-boilerplate React + Ethereum He has a configured boilerplate template. Has contract scaffolding. Enforced contract Linting/testing. Wallet generation/identity. Preconfigured web3 instance. UI: Mature react arhitecture "react boilerplate". Prices listed in USD with ETH/btc via kraken api. A basic multi-contract example Dapp. Offline first, dapp runs without internet. Uses Redux. State models in UI & blockchains work well. PostCSS, CSS Modules, sanitize.cs. Redux, immutableJS, reslect, redux-saga, i18n, redux-router. Web3, ethdeploy, dapple, solium, eth-lightwallet, chaithereum, ethereumjs0-testrpc Enforced contract testing in 2 languages.
Ethereum for Enterprise (BlockApps Strato)
Trying to make sure that Ethereum stays relevent to enterprise development. Why do you need a blockchain WITHIN an org, shouldn't they trust each other? Well different departments may not, they may reconcile differently, and can help automate/orchestrate between them. Blockchain is the "killer app" for cloud financial services. Legacy infrastructure, batch prossing, etc are all restricting fintech from progressing. Blockchain can happen in real time, can replace legacy. Ethereum is very flexible and programmable, works well. There are others based on Bitcoin (like Hyperledger). Ethereum + Blockapps = Extreme productivity + Proven Technology. Blockapps is extending Ethereum for Enterprise. Runs very well on Azure Enterprises don't want all their data exposed on public chain. Blockapps helps solve data privacy and scaling with multichain fabrics.
submitted by DavidBurela to ethereum [link] [comments]

IOTA, the COO and Inconvenient Truths

Hello All,
This post is meant to address the elephant in the room, and the #1 criticism that IOTA gets which is the existence of the Coordinator node.
The Coordinator or, COO for short, is a special piece of software that is operated by the IOTA Foundation. This software's function is to drop "milestone" transactions onto the Tangle that help in ordering of Transactions.
As this wonderful post on reddit highlights (https://www.reddit.com/Iota/comments/7c3qu8/coordinator_explained/)
When you want to know if a transaction is verified, you find the newest Milestone and you see if it indirectly verifies your transaction (i.e it verifies your transaction, or if verifies a transaction that verifies your transaction, or if it verifies a transaction that verifies a transaction that verifies your transaction, etc). The reason that the Milestones exist is because if you just picked any random transaction, there's the possibility that the node you're connected to is malicious and is trying to trick you into verifying its transactions. The people who operate nodes can't fake the signatures on Milestones, so you know you can trust the Milestones to be legit.
The COO protects the network, that is great right?
No, it is not.
The coordinator represents a centralized entity that draws the ire of the concurrency community in general is the reason behind a lot of FUD.
Here is where things get dicey. If you ask the IOTA Foundation, the last official response I heard was
We are running super computer simulations with the University of St. Peteresburg to determine when that could be a possibility.
This answer didn't satisfy me, so I've spent the last few weeks thinking about the problem and think I can explain the challenges that the IOTA Foundation are up against, what they expect to model with the super computer simulations, and what ultimately what my intuition (backed up by some back of the napkin mathematics) tells me that outcomes will be.
In order to understand the bounds of the problem, we first need to understand what our measuring stick is.
Our measuring stick provides measurements with respect to hashed per second. A hash, is a mathematical operation that blockchain (and DAG) based applications require before accepting your transaction. This is generally thought of as an anti-spam measure used to protect a blockchain network.
IOTA and Bitcoin share some things in common, and one of those things is that they both require Proof of Work in order to interact with the blockchain.
In IOTA, a single hash is completed for each Transaction that you submit. You complete this PoW at the time of submitting your Transaction, and you never revisit it again.
In Bitcoin, hashes are guessed at by millions of computers (miners) competing to be the first person to find solve the correct hash, and ultimately mint a new block.
Because of the competitive nature of the bitcoin mining mechanism, the bitcoin hashrate is a sustained hashrate, while the IOTA hashrate is "bursty" going through peaks and valleys as new transactions are submitted.
Essentially, IOTA performance is a function of the current throughput of the network. While, bitcoin's performance is a delicate balance between all collective miners, the hashing difficulty with the goal of pegging the block time to 10 minutes.
With all that said, I hope it is clear that we can come to the following conclusion.
The amount of CPU time required to compute 1 Bitcoin hash is much much greater then the amount of CPU time required to compute 1 IOTA hash.
T(BtcHash) >> T(IotaHash)
After all, low powered IOT devices are supposed to be able to execute the IOTA hashing function in order to submit their own transactions.
A "hash" has be looked at as an amount of work that needs to be completed. If you are solving a bitcoin hash, it will take a lot more work to solve then an IOTA hash.
When we want to measure IOTA, we usually look at "Transactions Per Second". Since each Transaction requires a single Hash to be completed, we can translate this measurement into "Hashes Per Second" that the entire network supports.
IOTA has seen Transactions Per Second on the order of magnitude of <100. That means, that at current adoption levels the IOTA network is supported and secured by 100 IOTA hashes per second (on a very good day).
Bitcoin hashes are much more difficult to solve. The bitcoin network is secured by 1 Bitcoin hash every 10 minutes (which adjust's it's difficult over time to remain pegged at 10 minutes). (More details on bitcoin mining: https://www.coindesk.com/information/how-bitcoin-mining-works/)
Without the COOs protection, IOTA would be a juicy target destroy. With only 100 IOTA hashes per second securing the network, that means that an individual would only need to maintain a sustained 34 hashes per second in order to completely take over the network.
Personally, my relatively moderate gaming PC takes about 60 seconds to solve IOTA Proof of Work before my transaction will be submitted to the Tangle. This is not a beastly machine, nor does it utilize specialized hardware to solve my Proof of Work. This gaming PC cost about $1000 to build, and provides me .0166 hashes per second.
**Using this figure, we can derive that consumer electronics provide hashing efficiency of roughly $60,000 USD / Hash / Second ($60k per hash per second) on the IOTA network.
Given that the Tx/Second of IOTA is around 100 on a good day, and it requires $60,000 USD to acquire 1Hash/Second of computing power we would need 34 * $60,000 to attack the IOTA network.
The total amount of money required to 34% the IOTA project is $2,040,00
This is a very small number. Not only that, but the hash rate required to conduct such an attack already exists, and it is likely that this attack has already been attempted.
The simple truth is, that due to the economic incentive of mining the hash rate required to attack IOTA is already centralized, and are foaming at the mouth to attack IOTA. This is why the Coordinator exists, and why it will not be going anywhere anytime soon.
The most important thing that needs to occur to remove the COO, is that the native measurement of transactions per second (which ultimately also measures the hashes per second) need to go drastically up in orders of magnitude.
If the IOTA transaction volume were to increase to 1000 transactions per second, then it would require 340 transactions per second from a malicious actor to compromise the network. In order to complete 340 transactions per second, the attacker would need now need the economic power of 340 * $60,000 to 34% attack the IOTA network.
In this hypothetical scenario, the cost of attacking the IOTA network is $20,400,000. This number is still pretty small, but at least you can see the pattern. IOTA will likely need to hit many-thousand transactions per second before it can be considered secure.
What we have to keep in mind here, is that IOTA has an ace up their sleeve, and that Ace is JINN Labs and the ternary processor that they are working on.
Ultimately, JINN is the end-game for the IOTA project that will make the removal of the COO a reality.
In order to understand what JINN is, we need to understand a little bit about computer architecture and the nature of computational instruction in general.
A "processor" is a piece of hardware that performs micro calculations. These micro calculations are usually very simple, such as adding two numbers, subtracting two numbers, incrementing, decrementing, and the like. The operation that is completed (addition, subtraction) is called the opcode while the numbers being operated on are called the operands.
Traditional processors, like the ones you find in my "regular gaming PC" are binary processors where both the opcode and operands are expected to be binary numbers (or a collection of 0s and 1s).
The JINN processor, provides the same functionality, mainly a hardware implementation of micro instructions. However, it expects the opcodes and operands to be ternary numbers (or a collection of 0s, 1s, and 2s).
I won't get into the computational data density of base 2 vs. base 3 processors, nor will get I get into the energy efficiency of those processors. What I will be getting into however, is how certain tasks are simpler to solve in certain number systems.
Depending on what operations are being executed upon the operands, performing the calculation in a different base will actually reduce the amount of steps required, and thus the execution time of the calculation. For an example, see how base 12 has been argued to be superior to base 10 (https://io9.gizmodo.com/5977095/why-we-should-switch-to-a-base-12-counting-system)
I want to be clear here. I am not saying that any 1 number system is superior to any other number system for all types of operations. I am simply saying, that there exist certain types of calculations that are easier to perform in base 2, then they are performed in base 10. Likewise, there are calculations that are vastly simpler in base 3 then they are in base 2.
The IOTA POW, and the algorithms required to solve for it is one of these algorithms. The IOTA PoW was designed to be ternary in nature, and I suggest that this is the reason right here. The data density and electricity savings that JINN provides are great, but the real design decision that has led to base 3 has been that they can now manufacture hardware that is superior at solving their own PoW calculations.
Binary emulation, is when a binary processor is asked to perform ternary operations. A binary processor is completely able to solve ternary hashes, but in order to do so it will need to emulate the ternary micro instructions at a higher level in the application stack from away from the hardware.
If you had access to a base 3 processor, and needed perform a base 3 addition operation you could easily ask your processor to natively perform that calculation.
If all you have access to, is a base 2 processor, you would need to emulate a base 3 number system in software. This would ultimately result in a higher number of instructions passing through your processor, more electricity being utilized, more time to complete.
Finally, let's review these figures.
It costs roughly $60k to acquire 1hash per second in BASE 2 consumer electrictronic. It costs roughly $2M to acquire enough BASE 2 hash rate to 34% the IOTA network.
JINN, will be specifically manufactured hardware that will solve base 3 hashes natively. What this likely means, is that $1 spent on JINN will be much more effective at acquiring base 3 hash rate then $1 spent on base 2 hash rate.
Finally, with bitcoin and traditional block chain applications there lies economic incentive to amass mining hardware.
It first starts out by a miner earning income from his mining rig. He then reinvests those profits on additional hardware to increase his income.
Eventually, this spirals into an arms raise where the players that are left in the game have increasingly available resources up until the point that there are only a handful of players left.
This economic incentive, creates a mass centralization of computing resources capable of being misused in a coordinated effort to attack a cryptocurrency.
IOTA aims to break this economic incentive, and the centralization that is causes. However, over the short term the fact that the centralization of such resources does exist is an existential peril to IOTA, and the COO is an inconvenient truth that we all have to live with.
Due to all the above, I think we can come to the following conclusions:
  1. IOTA will not be able to remove the COO until the transactions per second (and ultimately hashrate) increase by orders of magnitude.
  2. The performance of JINN processors, and their advantage of being able to compute natively on ternary operands and opcodes will be important for the value ratio of $USD / hash rate on the IOTA network
  3. Existing mining hardware is at a fundamental disadvantage to computing base 3 hashes when compared to a JINN processor designed specifically for that function
  4. Attrition of centralized base 2 hash power will occur if the practice of mining can be defeated and the income related to it. Then the incentive of amassing a huge amount of centralized computing power will be reduced.
  5. JINN processors, and their adoption in consume electronics (like cell phones and cars) hold the key in being able to provide enough "bursty" hash rate to defend the network from 34% attacks without the help of the COO.
submitted by localhost87 to MovingPixels [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc posts from 2018-05-14 to 2018-05-19 12:59 PDT

Period: 5.31 days
Submissions Comments
Total 783 12622
Rate (per day) 147.47 2006.25
Unique Redditors 432 1955
Combined Score 23860 47871

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1470 points, 7 submissions: hunk_quark
    1. Purse.io is paying its employees in Bitcoin Cash. (441 points, 63 comments)
    2. Forbes Author Frances Coppola takes blockstream to task. (359 points, 35 comments)
    3. Purse CEO Andrew Lee confirms they are paying employees in BCH and native BCH integration update will be coming soon! (334 points, 43 comments)
    4. After today's BCH Upgrade, longer posts are now enabled on memo.cash! (245 points, 31 comments)
    5. Bitcoin cash fund is providing cashback and prizes for using Bitcoin (BCH) on purse.io next month. (76 points, 4 comments)
    6. As an existential threat to his criminal enterprise Wells Fargo, Bitcoin is rat poison for Warren Buffet. (15 points, 1 comment)
    7. Craig Wright in Rwanda- "I've got more money than your country". With advocates like these, no wonder BCH has a PR problem. (0 points, 6 comments)
  2. 1419 points, 6 submissions: tralxz
    1. Breaking News: Winklevoss Brothers Bitcoin Exchange Adds Bitcoin Cash support! (510 points, 115 comments)
    2. Jihan Wu was asked "Why are the miners still supporting Bitcoin Core? Is it just a short term profitability play?", he answered: "Yes, exactly." (273 points, 214 comments)
    3. Cobra:"That feeling when Blockstream, [...] release Liquid, a completely centralized sidechain run only by trusted nodes and designed for banks, financial institutions and exchanges." (240 points, 145 comments)
    4. Jihan Wu on Bloomberg predicting Bitcoin Cash at $100,000 USD in 5 years. (169 points, 65 comments)
    5. CNBC's Fast Money: Ran NeuNer says he would HODL Bitcoin Cash and sell Bitcoin Core. (168 points, 58 comments)
    6. Coindesk: "Florida Tax Collector to Accept Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash Payments" (59 points, 8 comments)
  3. 1221 points, 14 submissions: Kain_niaK
    1. I am getting flashbacks from when I tried to close my Bank of America account ... (348 points, 155 comments)
    2. moneybutton.com is a configurable client-side Bitcoin Cash (BCH) wallet in an iframe. When the user makes a payment, a webhook URL is called allowing your app to respond to the payment, such as displaying content behind a pay wall. (189 points, 37 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Cash can turn in to the biggest non violent protest against the establishment ever : "We simply stop using their money." Which is a great way of getting edgy teenagers to join us. There is an almost infinite supply of edgy teenagers in the world. (153 points, 42 comments)
    4. Purse.io at the Coingeek conference in HK just announced native BCH support!!! They are also launching a new software implementation called "bcash" (111 points, 6 comments)
    5. Who is all doing stuff like this on Reddit? Do we realize that we can make the Bitcoin Cash economy easily 10 times as big just by getting Reddit users on board? All they need is a good first user experience. Bitcoin needs to be experienced above everything else before you even talk about it. (109 points, 53 comments)
    6. /cryptocurrency in meltdown (88 points, 16 comments)
    7. Ryan X Charles from Yours.org had an amazing to the point presentation about the future of content creation on the internet. (85 points, 12 comments)
    8. So now that we have had tippr and chaintip for a while, what are you guys favourite and why? Or do you use both? (43 points, 25 comments)
    9. John Moriarty about why you can't separate Bitcoin from Blockchain. (37 points, 12 comments)
    10. The next wave of attack will be all the big internet giants supporting Bitcoin Core and LN. Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, I bet you that the more successful Bitcoin Cash becomes the more you will see big cooperation’s be forced to go with compromised Bitcoin. (25 points, 28 comments)
  4. 623 points, 5 submissions: BitcoinXio
    1. Frances Coppola on Twitter: “Congratulations, Blockstream, you have just reinvented the interbank lending market.” (414 points, 139 comments)
    2. We have a new alternative public mod logs (101 points, 35 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) sponsored Mei Yamaguchi's championship fight will be live on YouTube in an hour or so (2 fights left before hers - Livestream) (53 points, 22 comments)
    4. Uncensored: /t/Bitcoin (reddit without the censorship) (49 points, 43 comments)
    5. Information post about the recent suspension and re-activation of publicmodlogs (Update) (6 points, 0 comments)
  5. 582 points, 1 submission: VanquishAudio
    1. Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate.. (582 points, 113 comments)
  6. 493 points, 8 submissions: MemoryDealers
    1. Bitcoin Cash supporting Bitmain is leading a $110M investment in Circle. This is super bullish for BCH on Circle! (122 points, 24 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Core supporter who scammed his way into consensus without a ticket is busy calling Bitcoin.com and others scammers at the event. (98 points, 140 comments)
    3. I see lots of people coming here every day asking why we think Bitcoin is BCH. Here is why I think so: (79 points, 73 comments)
    4. The Bitcoin.com CTO made a fun little transaction puzzle with one of the new op-codes: (79 points, 11 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Cash is the fighter that everyone loves. (42 points, 86 comments)
    6. This graphic aged well over the last 3 months. (34 points, 64 comments)
    7. An example of the sophisticated arguments BTC supporters use against BCH supporters. (20 points, 12 comments)
    8. Tired of staying up all night looking at CoinMarket Cap? Give Bitcoin.com's Satoshi Pulse a try in night mode! (19 points, 11 comments)
  7. 475 points, 4 submissions: rdar1999
    1. Consensus 2018 sucked hard. Superficial talks, ridiculous ticket price, overcrowded venue. (235 points, 78 comments)
    2. See in this twitter thread Luke Jr actually arguing that PayPal is cheaper than BCH!! Is this guy in full delirium? Or just spouts misinformation on purpose? (173 points, 227 comments)
    3. Upgrade completed at height 530356! (59 points, 2 comments)
    4. On decentralization and archival nodes. (8 points, 5 comments)
  8. 465 points, 17 submissions: Windowly
    1. Yeah!! "We are pleased to announce that the new Bitcoin Cash address format has been implemented on QuadrigaCX. This will help our users to easily distinguish Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash addresses when funding/withdrawing their account. The BCH legacy addresses will still be supported." (164 points, 8 comments)
    2. "Friendly reminder: If you pay more than the bare minimum (1/sat per byte) to send a #BitcoinCash BCH transaction - you paid too much. 👍🏻"~James Howells (99 points, 12 comments)
    3. Bitpay Enables Bitcoin Cash (BCH) and Bitcoin Core (BTC) for Tax Payments - Bitcoin News (59 points, 31 comments)
    4. "I like the symbology of 1,000,000 ␢ = 1 ₿ for #BitcoinCash What the 'little b' units are called I don't care that much, it will settle in whether it remains 'bits', or 'cash', or 'credits' ... " (55 points, 54 comments)
    5. ~Public Service Announcement~ Please be extra careful using Bitcoin Cash on the Trezor! They have not yet implemented CashAddr Security. Make sure to covert your address with cashaddr.bitcoincash.org and double check with a block explorer to make sure the address is the same. (39 points, 12 comments)
    6. "WRT telling others what to do or not to do (as opposed to asking them) on the point of making proposals or petitioning others - I hope we can take the time to re-read and take to heart @Falkvinge 's excellent dispute resolution advice in . ." [email protected] (33 points, 0 comments)
    7. Why I support Bitcoin Cash (BCH). And why I support cash-denominated wallets. 1$ is inconsequential pocket change to some. To others it is their livelihood. Thank you @BitcoinUnlimit & @Bitcoin_ABC for your work in this regard. (7 points, 16 comments)
    8. If anyone feels that they are forced or imposed to do anything, or threatened by any other person or group’s initiative, he doesn’t understand Bitcoin Cash (BCH). The beauty of Bitcoin Cash is that innovation & creativity is permissionless. Let’s celebrate new ideas together! (5 points, 1 comment)
    9. "Bits as a unit right now (100sat), no matter named bits or cash or whatever, is extremely useless at this time and in the near future : Its worth 1/11 of a CENT right now. Even it suddenly 10x, its still only 1 single cent."~Reina Nakamoto (2 points, 7 comments)
    10. Love this converter! Thank you @rogerkver ! At present 778.17 ␢ = 1 USD (1,000,000 ␢ = 1 ₿) Tools.bitcoin.com (2 points, 0 comments)
  9. 443 points, 33 submissions: kairostech99
    1. Purse.io Adds Native BCH Support and Launches 'Bcash' (116 points, 40 comments)
    2. Openbazaar Enables Decentralized Peer-To-Peer Trading of 44 Cryptocurrencies (93 points, 21 comments)
    3. Thailand Waives 7% VAT for Individual Cryptocurrency Investors (84 points, 1 comment)
    4. Switzerland Formally Considers State Backed Cryptocurrency (26 points, 8 comments)
    5. Research Paper Finds Transaction Patterns Can Degrade Zcash Privacy (24 points, 2 comments)
    6. Japan's GMO Gets Ready to Start Selling 7nm Bitcoin Mining Chips (21 points, 0 comments)
    7. MMA Fighter Mei Yamaguchi Comes Out Swinging for Bitcoin.com (18 points, 5 comments)
    8. Bitmain Hits Back at “Dirty Tricks” Accusations (15 points, 4 comments)
    9. Circle Raises $110Mn With Plans to Launch USD-Backed Coin (6 points, 2 comments)
    10. Coinbase Remains the Most Successful and Important Company in the Crypto Industry (5 points, 7 comments)
  10. 420 points, 4 submissions: crypto_advocate
    1. Jihan on Roger: "I learnt a lot about being open and passionate about what you believe in from him[Roger]" (161 points, 45 comments)
    2. Bitcoin.com's first officially sponsored MMA fighter head to toe in Bitcoin Cash gear on her walkout - "She didn't win but won the hearts of a lot of new fans" (150 points, 14 comments)
    3. "Bitcoin Community is thriving again" Roger Ver at CoinGeek (98 points, 8 comments)
    4. Today is a historic day. [Twitter] (11 points, 1 comment)
  11. 376 points, 2 submissions: singularity87
    1. Bitcoin Cash Fund has partnered with Purse.io to launch their suite of BCH services and tools. (212 points, 15 comments)
    2. Proposal - Makes 'bits' (1 millionth BCH) the standard denomination and 'BIT' the ticker. (164 points, 328 comments)
  12. 349 points, 1 submission: bearjewpacabra
    1. UPGRADE COMPLETE (349 points, 378 comments)
  13. 342 points, 1 submission: Devar0
    1. Congrats! Bitcoin Cash is now capable of a 32MB block size, and new OP_CODES are reactivated! (342 points, 113 comments)
  14. 330 points, 3 submissions: btcnewsupdates
    1. Amaury Sechet in HK: "We want to be as boring as possible... If we do our job well, you won't even notice us." (173 points, 29 comments)
    2. This is the way forward: Miners Consider Using Bitcoin Cash Block Reward to Fund Development (136 points, 86 comments)
    3. Merchant adoption: unexpected success. Perhaps the community should now put more of its focus on canvassing end users. (21 points, 7 comments)
  15. 318 points, 3 submissions: HostFat
    1. From One to Two: Bitcoin Cash – Purse: Save 20%+ on Amazon [2018] (173 points, 25 comments)
    2. Open Bazzar v2.2.0 - P2P market and P2P exchange now! (92 points, 15 comments)
    3. Tree Signature Variations using Commutative Hash Trees - Andrew Stone (53 points, 5 comments)
  16. 287 points, 1 submission: Libertymark
    1. Congrats BCH developers, we appreciate your work here and continued innovation (287 points, 79 comments)
  17. 260 points, 9 submissions: unitedstatian
    1. The guy had 350 bucks received via Lightning Network but he can't even close the channels to actually withdraw the bitcoins. (135 points, 188 comments)
    2. The first megabytes are far more crucial than the 100th. Not every MB was born equal and by giving up on adoption for years Core may have given up on adoption forever. (69 points, 20 comments)
    3. Looks like fork.lol is misleading users on purpose into thinking the fees on BTC and BCH are the same (28 points, 32 comments)
    4. Just because the nChain patents aren't on the base protocol level doesn't mean it's a good idea, BCH could end up with patents which are so part of its normal use it will effectively be part of it. (13 points, 33 comments)
    5. [Not a meme] This is what the TxHighway BTC road should look like when the memepool is large. The unconfirmed tx's should be represented with cars waiting in the toll lines. (9 points, 2 comments)
    6. Lighthouse should have a small button to easily integrate it with any web page where a task is required (4 points, 1 comment)
    7. Poland Becomes World's First to put Banking Records on the Blockchain (2 points, 3 comments)
    8. If I were Core and wanted to spam BCH, and since spamming with multiple tx's will be counterproductive, I'd pay unnecessarily high fees instead (0 points, 32 comments)
    9. What happens when "the man" starts blocking nodes in China now that they function as mass media? (0 points, 1 comment)
  18. 259 points, 2 submissions: outofsync42
    1. Sportsbook.com now accepting BCH!! (215 points, 42 comments)
    2. BITCOIN CASH VS BITCOIN 2018 | Roger Ver on CNBC Fast Money (44 points, 15 comments)
  19. 255 points, 2 submissions: Bitcoinmathers
    1. Bitcoin Cash Upgrade Milestone Complete: 32MB and New Features (255 points, 90 comments)
    2. Bitgo Launches Institutional Grade Custodial Services Suite (0 points, 0 comments)
  20. 223 points, 2 submissions: ForkiusMaximus
    1. Japanese tweeter makes a good point about BTC: "You don't call it an asset if it crumbles away every time you go to use it. You call it a consumable." (141 points, 21 comments)
    2. Jimmy Nguyen: Bitcoin Cash can function for higher level technical programming (82 points, 3 comments)
  21. 218 points, 3 submissions: mccormack555
    1. Trying to see both sides of the scaling debate (193 points, 438 comments)
    2. Has Craig Wright Committed Perjury? New Information in the Kleiman Case (25 points, 56 comments)
    3. Thoughts on this person as a representative of Bitcoin Cash? (0 points, 21 comments)
  22. 216 points, 4 submissions: jimbtc
    1. $50K worth of crypto to anyone who leaks the inner communications of the #CultOfCore (183 points, 29 comments)
    2. Liquidity Propaganda: "The formation of payment hubs happens naturally even in two-party payment channels like the Lightning Network.". LOL. Fuel the LN vs Liquidity fire :D (31 points, 7 comments)
    3. WBD 017 - Interview with Samson Mow (2 points, 19 comments)
    4. If you wanted further proof that Andreas Antonopolous is a BCore Coreonic Cuck then here's a new speech from May 6th (0 points, 8 comments)
  23. 212 points, 1 submission: porlybe
    1. 32 Lanes on TXHighway (212 points, 96 comments)
  24. 211 points, 3 submissions: Akari_bit
    1. "AKARI-PAY Advanced" Released, for Bitcoin Cash! (73 points, 6 comments)
    2. 129% funded! We flew by our first BCH fundraising goal, demonstrating AKARI-PAY! HUGE SUCCESS! (70 points, 7 comments)
    3. Devs.Cash updated with new Dev projects, tools, and bounties for Bitcoin Cash! (68 points, 7 comments)
  25. 210 points, 1 submission: CollinEnstad
    1. Purse.io Introduces 'bcash', an Implementation of the BCH protocol, just like ABC, BU, or Classic (210 points, 125 comments)
  26. 206 points, 20 submissions: marcelchuo3
    1. Bitcoin Cash Community Sees OP_Code Innovation After Upgrade (70 points, 3 comments)
    2. Coingeek Conference 2018: Bitcoin Cash Innovation Shines in Hong Kong (65 points, 4 comments)
    3. Bitfinex Starts Sharing Customer Tax Data with Authorities (16 points, 3 comments)
    4. Colorado Proposal Aims to Allow Cryptocurrency Donations for Campaigns (12 points, 2 comments)
    5. Thailand Commences Cryptocurrency Regulations Today (8 points, 1 comment)
    6. Bitcoin Mining Manufacturer Canaan Files for Hong Kong Stock Exchange IPO (7 points, 0 comments)
    7. Bitcoin in Brief Thursday: OECD Explores Cryptocurrencies, Central Asian Powerhouse Calls for UN Crypto Rules (5 points, 0 comments)
    8. Moldova with New Crypto Exchange and a Token (5 points, 0 comments)
    9. Korean Regulators Widen Investigation of Cryptocurrency Exchanges (4 points, 0 comments)
    10. Arrest Warrants Issued to Employees of South Korean Crypto Exchange (3 points, 0 comments)
  27. 198 points, 1 submission: anberlinz
    1. I used to think BCH was the bad guy, now I'm beginning to change the way I see it... Convince me that BCH is the real Bitcoin (198 points, 294 comments)
  28. 196 points, 1 submission: Chris_Pacia
    1. First tree signature on Bitcoin Cash using new opcodes (196 points, 61 comments)
  29. 191 points, 3 submissions: cryptorebel
    1. Coinbase blog from 2015: "bits is the new default". The reason "bits" stopped being used was because of high fees on segwitcoin. Lets bring back "bits" on the real Bitcoin-BCH! (106 points, 66 comments)
    2. Here is the Bitcoin-BCH countdown clock to the hard fork upgrade with new 32MB block limit capacity, and re-enabled op-codes. Looks like its about 17 hours away. (78 points, 2 comments)
    3. This is Core's idea of open development, you are "super welcome" to work on anything that the gatekeepers say is ok. People tout Core as having so many devs but it doesn't matter much when you have to go through the gatekeepers. (7 points, 14 comments)
  30. 186 points, 2 submissions: coinfeller
    1. Bitcoin Cash France is offering 32 000 bits of BCH for Tipping Tuesday to celebrate the upgrade from 8MB to 32MB (178 points, 101 comments)
    2. How the Bitcoin Cash upgrade from 8MB to 32MB seems like :) (8 points, 10 comments)
  31. 185 points, 3 submissions: money78
    1. Congratulations Bitcoin Cash for the 32MB, WTG! (93 points, 5 comments)
    2. Roger Ver on CNBC's Fast Money again and he says bitcoin cash will double by the end of the year! (68 points, 30 comments)
    3. The Bitcoin Cash upgrade: over 8 million transactions per day, data monitoring, and other possibilities (24 points, 3 comments)
  32. 182 points, 26 submissions: haumeris28
    1. MMA Fighter Mei Yamaguchi Sponsored By Bitcoin Cash Proponent Roger Ver (32 points, 3 comments)
    2. Swiss Government is Studying the Risks and Benefits of State-Backed Cryptocurrency (30 points, 3 comments)
    3. Circle and Bitmain partner for US Dollar backed Token (25 points, 18 comments)
    4. Apple Co-Founder - Ethereum Has the Potential to be the Next Apple (16 points, 13 comments)
    5. Florida County To Begin Accepting Tax Payments in Crypto (14 points, 0 comments)
    6. ‘Blockchain Will Drive the Next Industrial Revolution’, According to a Major Wall Street Firm (11 points, 0 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Cash Undergoes a Hard Fork, Increases Block Size (10 points, 3 comments)
    8. Newly Appointed Goldman Sachs Vice President Leaves for Cryptocurrency (7 points, 5 comments)
    9. OKEx CEO Quits as Exchange Becomes World’s Largest Surpassing Binance (7 points, 2 comments)
    10. Texas Regulators Shut Down Crypto Scam, Falsely Using Jennifer Aniston and Prince Charles for Promotion (6 points, 0 comments)
  33. 174 points, 31 submissions: MarkoVidrih
    1. US Regulators Agree That They Will Not Will Not Suppress Cryptocurrencies (96 points, 10 comments)
    2. Why Stable Coins Are the New Central Bank Money (28 points, 9 comments)
    3. First Facebook, Then Google, Twitter and LinkedIn, Now Microsoft’s Bing Will Ban All Cryptocurrency Ads (10 points, 2 comments)
    4. Circle Raises $110 Mln and Plans to Use Circle USD Coin (USDC) instead of Tether (USDT) (9 points, 1 comment)
    5. 9 Million New Users Are About to Enter in Crypto Market (4 points, 6 comments)
    6. Japan’s Largest Commercial Bank Will Try its Own Cryptocurrency in 2019 (4 points, 0 comments)
    7. The Viability of the ERC-948 Protocol Proposal (4 points, 0 comments)
    8. A letter from Legendary VC Fred Wilson to Buffet: The Value of Bitcoin Lies in the Agreement Itself (3 points, 1 comment)
    9. This is Just The Beginning of Crypto! (3 points, 0 comments)
    10. What? U.S. SEC Just Launches ICO Called HoweyCoin (3 points, 2 comments)
  34. 170 points, 2 submissions: plaguewiind
    1. Twitter restricting accounts that mention Blockstream (104 points, 49 comments)
    2. This is actually fantastic! Jimmy Nguyen on ‘The Future of Bitcoin (Cash)’ at The University of Exeter (66 points, 31 comments)
  35. 168 points, 1 submission: MartinGandhiKennedy
    1. [COMPELLING EVIDENCE] Proof that Luke Jr does not lie (168 points, 41 comments)
  36. 167 points, 1 submission: higher-plane
    1. BCH showerthought: The first one or two killer apps for Bitcoin Cash that drive mass adoption will be the thing that decides the standards/denominations based on what people are using and catches on. Not a small forum poll or incessantly loud Twitter spam. (167 points, 24 comments)
  37. 160 points, 1 submission: SharkLaserrrrr
    1. [PREVIEW] Looks like Lighthouse powered by Bitcoin Cash is coming together nicely thanks to the hard work of an anonymous developer. I wonder how Mike Hearn feels about his project being resurrected. (160 points, 24 comments)
  38. 160 points, 1 submission: playfulexistence
    1. Lightning Network user has trouble with step 18 (160 points, 165 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. bambarasta (898 points, 154 comments)
  2. Kain_niaK (706 points, 177 comments)
  3. Ant-n (691 points, 145 comments)
  4. H0dl (610 points, 116 comments)
  5. Adrian-X (538 points, 93 comments)
  6. KoKansei (536 points, 35 comments)
  7. LovelyDay (456 points, 78 comments)
  8. 324JL (444 points, 109 comments)
  9. LexGrom (428 points, 132 comments)
  10. Erumara (427 points, 44 comments)
  11. lubokkanev (404 points, 119 comments)
  12. LuxuriousThrowAway (397 points, 66 comments)
  13. rdar1999 (387 points, 82 comments)
  14. zcc0nonA (379 points, 100 comments)
  15. MemoryDealers (369 points, 18 comments)
  16. RollieMe (366 points, 29 comments)
  17. Churn (352 points, 32 comments)
  18. jimbtc (349 points, 72 comments)
  19. btcnewsupdates (338 points, 61 comments)
  20. blockthestream (338 points, 25 comments)
  21. SharkLaserrrrr (335 points, 33 comments)
  22. kondratiex (311 points, 80 comments)
  23. trolldetectr (306 points, 58 comments)
  24. ForkiusMaximus (300 points, 47 comments)
  25. jonald_fyookball (300 points, 35 comments)
  26. mccormack555 (294 points, 78 comments)
  27. playfulexistence (292 points, 40 comments)
  28. scotty321 (287 points, 46 comments)
  29. BitcoinXio (269 points, 23 comments)
  30. TiagoTiagoT (263 points, 96 comments)
  31. Bitcoinopoly (260 points, 39 comments)
  32. homopit (249 points, 48 comments)
  33. DoomedKid (249 points, 41 comments)
  34. cryptorebel (246 points, 54 comments)
  35. Deadbeat1000 (243 points, 36 comments)
  36. mrtest001 (239 points, 78 comments)
  37. BeijingBitcoins (235 points, 16 comments)
  38. tippr (227 points, 122 comments)
  39. chainxor (226 points, 24 comments)
  40. emergent_reasons (222 points, 56 comments)
  41. morli (221 points, 1 comment)
  42. patrick99e99 (220 points, 8 comments)
  43. crasheger (214 points, 39 comments)
  44. ---Ed--- (213 points, 81 comments)
  45. radmege (212 points, 35 comments)
  46. anberlinz (212 points, 33 comments)
  47. unstoppable-cash (211 points, 46 comments)
  48. taipalag (210 points, 35 comments)
  49. rowdy_beaver (210 points, 25 comments)
  50. RareJahans (206 points, 45 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate.. by VanquishAudio (582 points, 113 comments)
  2. Breaking News: Winklevoss Brothers Bitcoin Exchange Adds Bitcoin Cash support! by tralxz (510 points, 115 comments)
  3. Purse.io is paying its employees in Bitcoin Cash. by hunk_quark (441 points, 63 comments)
  4. Frances Coppola on Twitter: “Congratulations, Blockstream, you have just reinvented the interbank lending market.” by BitcoinXio (414 points, 139 comments)
  5. Forbes Author Frances Coppola takes blockstream to task. by hunk_quark (359 points, 35 comments)
  6. UPGRADE COMPLETE by bearjewpacabra (349 points, 378 comments)
  7. I am getting flashbacks from when I tried to close my Bank of America account ... by Kain_niaK (348 points, 155 comments)
  8. Congrats! Bitcoin Cash is now capable of a 32MB block size, and new OP_CODES are reactivated! by Devar0 (342 points, 113 comments)
  9. Purse CEO Andrew Lee confirms they are paying employees in BCH and native BCH integration update will be coming soon! by hunk_quark (334 points, 43 comments)
  10. Congrats BCH developers, we appreciate your work here and continued innovation by Libertymark (287 points, 79 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 221 points: morli's comment in Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate..
  2. 181 points: patrick99e99's comment in I used to think BCH was the bad guy, now I'm beginning to change the way I see it... Convince me that BCH is the real Bitcoin
  3. 173 points: RollieMe's comment in Trying to see both sides of the scaling debate
  4. 151 points: blockthestream's comment in Bitcoin Core supporter who scammed his way into consensus without a ticket is busy calling Bitcoin.com and others scammers at the event.
  5. 136 points: seleneum's comment in I am getting flashbacks from when I tried to close my Bank of America account ...
  6. 132 points: Falkvinge's comment in Talking to himself makes it so obvious that they're the same. lol
  7. 127 points: MemoryDealers's comment in Bitcoin Core supporter who scammed his way into consensus without a ticket is busy calling Bitcoin.com and others scammers at the event.
  8. 119 points: BitcoinXio's comment in Frances Coppola on Twitter: “Congratulations, Blockstream, you have just reinvented the interbank lending market.”
  9. 116 points: Erumara's comment in I used to think BCH was the bad guy, now I'm beginning to change the way I see it... Convince me that BCH is the real Bitcoin
  10. 115 points: KoKansei's comment in Purse.io Introduces 'bcash', an Implementation of the BCH protocol, just like ABC, BU, or Classic
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Let's try something different. I want to auction my domain [extranonce.com] for BTC. Any takers?

Hey guys, long time lurker. I thought this would be a cool way of leveraging BTC to sell an online good. Any takers? Bidding starts at 0.0242 Bitcoin ($10 dollars USD)
my address is 13S56WUXFTsPrE55j4Qdye1SPnqnVSuSea
$ dig -t txt extranonce.com ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> -t txt extranonce.com ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 4218 ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 2, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0 ;; QUESTION SECTION: ;extranonce.com. IN TXT ;; ANSWER SECTION: extranonce.com. 1799 IN TXT "v=spf1 include:spf.efwd.registrar-servers.com ~all" extranonce.com. 1798 IN TXT "patfriedrice-13S56WUXFTsPrE55j4Qdye1SPnqnVSuSea" 
submitted by patfriedrice to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Need to Know About the Ethereum Classic (ETC) in 2018. Hot ETC Signals. Top 5 Events for ETC coins Schnorr BIP, Taproot BIP, Tapscript BIP ~ bitcoin-dev Mailing List

At the time of writing, a Qtum goes for USD 1.66 and is available in 86 exchanges, including major exchanges like Binance, Bitfinex, Bittrex, Kraken, and Huobi Global. How It works. Essentially, the QTUM team forked Bitcoin’s code and altered its consensus mechanism from Proof-of-Work to Proof-of-Stake . Bitcoin’s UTXO (Unspent Transaction Output) model allows high traceability of ... Bitcoin has been called “digital gold,” and for justified reasons. To date, the total value of the currency is close to $112 billion USD. The aim of this blog is to help you go through all ... The Bitcoin ABC project, which operates the main client of Bitcoin Cash, has laid out a rodmap for two hardforks, one this summer and another during autumn. Neither has been finalized, but some of the potential improvements include a change of the block size consensus rule towards an adaptive blocksize limit. That suggests the network […] Post hard fork Bitcoin Cash re-enabled opcodes previously disabled in the early days of Bitcoin for fear of bugs. Re-enabling the opcodes makes Bitcoin Cash’s scripting language more flexible than Bitcoin’s so assets could potentially be tokenized on its chain and simple smart contracts executed. To improve Bitcoin Cash’s scaling capabilities Graphene blocks are being incorporated to ... Bitcoin ist wieder in der Handelsspanne der Tage vor dem falschen Ausbruch. Die erste Unterstützungsstufe liegt jetzt bei 9400 USD, gefolgt von 9150 USD – 9200 USD, was das gestrige Tief war. Weiter unten liegen 9000, 8800 und 8650 Dollar.

[index] [3736] [32707] [19685] [35507] [44524] [50184] [37674] [10666] [46803] [22901]

Need to Know About the Ethereum Classic (ETC) in 2018. Hot ETC Signals. Top 5 Events for ETC coins

Here are two BIP drafts that specify a proposal for a Taproot softfork. A number of ideas are included: * Taproot to make all outputs and cooperative spends indistinguishable from eachother ... Ethereum Classic review hot events in 2018. Expert crypto signals. Ethereum Classic (ETC) crypto. At the time of review: Circulating Supply: 100 681 931 ETC Market Cap: $1 922 370 450 USD Rank 16 ...

#